Newspaper article The Queensland Times (Ipswich, Australia)

People Fight for Limestone Hill; When Council Bulldozer Wreaked Destruction, Ipswich Residents Had Other Plans

Newspaper article The Queensland Times (Ipswich, Australia)

People Fight for Limestone Hill; When Council Bulldozer Wreaked Destruction, Ipswich Residents Had Other Plans

Article excerpt

TIME PAST

BERYL JOHNSTON

HEADLINES on an article in the Queensland Times on December 2, 1966, read citizens object to Hill change.

The citizens of Ipswich were up in arms when it was learnt that a City Council bulldozer had levelled most of the historical lime hill near Cunningham's Knoll on Limestone Hill.

Mr Les Thomas, president of the Ipswich Historical society said: "I was shocked to learn of the removal of this most historic landmark. This monument of what was the first industry in Ipswich and Queensland was of historical importance. Many natives of this city and district will be incensed at this unforgivable destruction."

The City Engineer, Mr G Kennedy, rang Mr Thomas and assured him that every endeavour would be made to replace the lime hill near Cunningham's Knoll.

Mr Thomas stated: "Although I do not consider that the lime hill can be completely restored I am pleased to see that official action has been taken on the matter such an unwarranted act is not likely to occur again."

Shortly after, the hill of limestone was restored as best as possible by Council workmen.

Among well-known Ipswich men who wrote letters protesting about this destruction were Stuart Patterson, chairman Ipswich Beautification Council, Allan Whybird, WJ Berry and Thomas Shapcott.

Part of the editorial of the QT read: "That City Council bulldozer on Thursday stirred up more than what one correspondent in today's issue (3/12/66) issue referred to as "The Old Hummock. Full marks to those citizens who were up in arms about this puzzling changing of the face of the limestone hill on which a town was raised.

"There are occasions on which demolition must occur in the cause of progress or city beautification, but surely this was not one of them.

"Apparently an attempt is being made to restore the area as near as possible to its original state, but this will be difficult. Once again, it seems, the public is to be kept in the dark as to the reason for this decision and whose it was.

"This is as disturbing a feature of the whole affair as any - nobody is prepared to let us know what the explanation is.

Will this also be discussed in committee? …

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