Newspaper article Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England)

Big Names to Tackle Stigma of Dementia; CAMPAIGN BRINGS TOGETHER THOSE AFFECTED BY DISEASE

Newspaper article Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England)

Big Names to Tackle Stigma of Dementia; CAMPAIGN BRINGS TOGETHER THOSE AFFECTED BY DISEASE

Article excerpt

Byline: MIKE KELLY Reporter mike.kelly@ncjmedia.co.uk @MIKEJKELLY1962

A CAMPAIGN to unite people in the fight against dementia and get rid of its stigma has been launched today.

The drive by the Alzheimer's Society has been backed by a host of celebrities, a number of whose family members have been struck down by the disease, including football pundit Robbie Savage and Uriah Rennie, who once sent off Newcastle United legend Alan Shearer.

Every three minutes someone develops dementia - a degenerative brain disease that slowly erodes memory and thinking skills - but the Alzheimer's Society says people often face up to it alone.

And new figures released by the charity from an Ipsos MORI survey revealed the extent to which people in this region not only fear dementia, but stigmatise those living with it. A shocking 58% of North East adults aged between 16 and 75 agree that if they had dementia they would feel their life was over.

Meanwhile, 24% surveyed would feel uncomfortable talking to someone with dementia on the phone, and 21% would feel uncomfortable talking face-toface.

George Short, of Chapel House, Newcastle, was diagnosed with dementia in 2015 and knows only too well about the stigma associated with the condition.

The former electrical wholesaler and Royal Northumberland Fusilier says he often feels "invisible" when people stop to chat to him and wife Marian.

George, 82, a one-time prolific darts player with a string of trophies, gave up his beloved sport when he began having difficulty keeping score.

He said: "I don't think people mean to be rude - I just think they get embarrassed, so they direct questions at Marian instead of me.

"Sometimes I can communicate quite well, but then it's as if a curtain comes down in my mind and I just can't get to the end of a sentence. It's incredibly frustrating. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.