Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

Why Working from Home Can Still Leave Us Stressed; When Looking for a New Job, We Don't Just Want More Pay -- We Also Want Less Stress, but While Home Working Appears Great, for Many It Means They Never Switch off, Writes Niki Chesworth

Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

Why Working from Home Can Still Leave Us Stressed; When Looking for a New Job, We Don't Just Want More Pay -- We Also Want Less Stress, but While Home Working Appears Great, for Many It Means They Never Switch off, Writes Niki Chesworth

Article excerpt

Byline: Niki Chesworth

IF YOU have got a job, the chances are you are more satisfied, enjoying more opportunities, feeling more engaged in your work and more motivated than you were last year. You are probably even happy with your boss. In fact, the emotion that employees most readily associate with work is that of being cheerful.

However, while job satisfaction is on the up, according to the latest Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD) Employee Outlook survey, and work is more flexible than ever, that does not mean we're immune to stresses of work -- or that we are all happy to stay put.

One in three employees is looking to move jobs in order to help reduce stress, which despite our increasing job satisfaction is a significant issue -- particularly if you work in the capital.

Overall, one in five of all employees is looking for a job -- and half of these have actually started applying.

In addition to seeking a role with less stress, another key reason for looking elsewhere is to get better pay and benefits (54 per cent). Nearly as many (46 per cent) want to increase their overall job satisfaction.

STRESSED OUT Not surprisingly, Londoners are the most stressed workers in the UK, according to research from Lee Hecht Harrison Penna, the global HR consultancy, to coincide with the end of Stress Awareness Month.

Almost a quarter of staff are frazzled by work and reporting "significant stress each day at work".

The under-35s are particularly hardhit by pressure.

Even when we leave the office, many of us find it hard to switch off, with research showing that a third of employees take home work to complete in the evenings or at weekends. Seven in 10 Londoners also admit to checking their work emails in the evenings or weekends (compared to a national average of less than half ). It is a fear of losing their job that often drives them to work even harder -- two-thirds claim that the thought is sometimes or always on their mind.

Research by Talking Talent, the innovative coaching and consulting company, shows that graduates, senior managers and working parents are at greatest risk.

More than half of all professionals say they are "worn out at work", but this rises to more than two-thirds of working parents and seven in 10 senior managers, according to the survey.

THE PARENT TRAP Such is the pressure to be at work that a significant number of parents do not even manage to take all of their annual leave.

More than a quarter (27 per cent) of working parents surveyed by Talking Talent said that on average, seven or more days of their holiday went unused due to workload last year.

The gap is wider for men at work, with 72 per cent of fathers claiming to be physically and emotionally worn out by their work and working environment, compared to 51 per cent of working men who do not have children. …

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