Newspaper article The Journal (Newcastle, England)

Power of the Political Poster; Parliament Has Been Dissolved and the Gloves Are off as Political Parties Aim to Win Votes. We Take a Look at Some of the Most Memorable Campaign Posters of the Past

Newspaper article The Journal (Newcastle, England)

Power of the Political Poster; Parliament Has Been Dissolved and the Gloves Are off as Political Parties Aim to Win Votes. We Take a Look at Some of the Most Memorable Campaign Posters of the Past

Article excerpt

THE election campaign has now officially started as Parliament has been dissolved. In the next phase of the battle comes the release of campaign posters, with the Tories revealing their first one on Wednesday.

However its Labour tax bombshell offering looks oddly familiar as we discovered while taking a look at posters from previous campaigns.

1. 1979 General Election - Labour Isn't Working One of the best-known political posters was Saatchi & Saatchi's 'Labour Isn't Working'. It showed a picture of a snaking dole queue outside an unemployment office.

Interestingly the picture was a fake and made up of volunteers from the Hendon Young Conservatives. There were only 20 of them and so a number of pictures had to be spliced together to give the required effect.

2. 1997 General Election - New Labour, New Danger This advert was condemned by the Labour Party as negative advertising while the Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) received 150 complaints about it.

The ASA upheld the complaints and instructed the Conservatives to withdraw the poster, stating they believed it portrayed Blair as "dishonest and sinister" - which of course was far from the truth - and also because the campaign didn't have Blair's permission to use his image.

3. 2001 General Election - Be afraid, be very afraid Labour used a picture of new Tory leader William Hague morphed into Margaret Thatcher. The original strapline for it was 'Vote on Thursday or this gets back in'. Tony Blair, who reportedly had concerns about the idea in the first place, objected to the disrespectful 'this' in reference to Hague which led to the 'Be afraid, be very afraid' line.

4. 1992 General Election - Labour's Tax Bombshell The 1992 result when John Major beat Neil Kinnock has often been portrayed as one of the biggest surprises in British electoral history. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.