Newspaper article Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England)

Enduring Appeal of Global Stars Maiden Bowls over Crowd; MICK BURGESS REVIEWS IRON MAIDEN AT THE METRO RADIO ARENA IN NEWCASTLE

Newspaper article Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England)

Enduring Appeal of Global Stars Maiden Bowls over Crowd; MICK BURGESS REVIEWS IRON MAIDEN AT THE METRO RADIO ARENA IN NEWCASTLE

Article excerpt

WHILE high-profile, media-hyped attempts at cracking America by the likes of Oasis and Robbie Williams failed spectacularly, Iron Maiden went about conquering not just the States but just about every country in existence, with barely a whisper in the mainstream press.

Travel to any country and there's every chance you'll see plenty of people wearing their T-shirts emblazoned with their iconic logo and skull-headed mascot, Eddie.

With five UK No1 albums, a clutch of gold and platinum albums to their name and playing to packed out stadiums worldwide, Iron Maiden are just about the biggest "underground" band on the planet.

Hated by the mainstream, ignored by the industry, loved by the fans, their "us against the world" attitude suits them just fine and, after over 40 years and 100 million albums sold, Maiden hit the road again in support of their latest chart-topping opus Book of Souls, arriving in Newcastle for their first show in the region for six years.

It's no surprise that the Metro Radio Arena was sold out months ago, such is the fervour of their hugely loyal fanbase, that could in itself be the subject of an anthropology thesis such is the mix of young and old, hairy rocker and trendy hipster, and people from around the globe - a real melting pot of everything society has to offer. And for those lucky enough to grab a ticket, they had the time of their lives.

Maiden don't play things safe and that's why we love them. There's no predictable opening salvo of surefire hits to hit the ground running, but two cuts from their latest masterpiece, Book of Souls, with the monstrous epic If Eternity Should Fail followed by the duck and dive punch of Speed of Light to get the crowd truly fired up.

Vintage cuts follow in the shape of Wrathchild from their last Paul Di'Anno-fronted album, Killers and the welcome return of Children of The Damned to the set from Number of The Beast, their first with Bruce Dickinson.

The set was well balanced between new songs (The Red and The Black, Death or Glory), old classics (the pyro-fuelled The Number of the Beast, Wasted Years) and those treasures that the long-standing fans come to shows for, with Powerslave satisfying those very people with its huge, hulking Egyptian-esque riff and dramatic delivery. …

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