Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

May Must Recognise That Teamwork Is a Better Way to Govern Than Autocracy

Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

May Must Recognise That Teamwork Is a Better Way to Govern Than Autocracy

Article excerpt

Byline: Matthew d'Ancona

IN A campaign of hectic volatility, Amber Rudd is fast emerging as the Conservative Party's leader-inwaiting. Though her elderly father died on Monday, the Home Secretary not only insisted upon appearing at the BBC's leaders' debate last night (standing in for Theresa May) but acquitted herself impressively in the seven-way shouting match.

As the other six engaged in playground politics, Rudd addressed viewers as adults, reminding them that public spending requires growth, that government is about priorities and that the test of leadership is unpalatable choices. Whatever happens on June 8, the Home Secretary is now in pole position to succeed May.

It is a measure of how much has changed since the PM called the election that such a question is even worth posing. When May announced her decision to go to the country, the Tories were more than 20 points ahead and the media fretted about the difficulty of making the forthcoming campaign look like a real fight. Well, it is now.

I still think May will prevail, though not, perhaps, by the crushing margin that she had hoped for. Orthodox as it is to say that he is having a great campaign, Jeremy Corbyn continues to look and sound like an affable activist rather than a prospective Prime Minister. His first answer to a question is often impressively calm and mellifluous but he falters when pressed for detail, as he did last night when asked about the Manchester bomber's motivation. Worse, his definition of leadership conspicuously failed to mention the ability to make priorities, the readiness to say "no" and the recognition that diplomacy does not always succeed. Government is not a taxpayer-funded rally.

As for the Tories, this campaign has laid bare shortcomings that will cause serious problems if they are not corrected. The attacks on Nick Timothy and Fiona Hill, May's chiefs of staff, are ridiculously overblown and, in any case, miss the point. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.