Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

Batting Notes Helped Me and Could Be the Answer to Roy Rediscovering Form; England V Pakistan CHAMPIONS TROPHY SEMI-FINALTomorrow, 10.30, Cardiff, Sky Sports 2

Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

Batting Notes Helped Me and Could Be the Answer to Roy Rediscovering Form; England V Pakistan CHAMPIONS TROPHY SEMI-FINALTomorrow, 10.30, Cardiff, Sky Sports 2

Article excerpt

Byline: James Taylor

WHEN you're not scoring runs, sometimes a period out of the side can be the best thing for you. I don't remember being dropped many times in my career, but there were certainly occasions when I can look back and see that I should have been.

Jason Roy will want to keep his place in the England team for tomorrow's Champions Trophy semi-final against Pakistan but if he is left out, he may reflect that it was good for him in the long run.

Before England's game against Australia, I thought it might be Roy's last chance in this tournament and captain Eoin Morgan did not offer the same backing that he did before the tournament started, or after the matches against Bangladesh and New Zealand.

If he is to be dropped, Jonny Bairstow is the man to come in. I know he hasn't opened for England in one-day cricket, but he scored 174 off 113 balls for York-shire at the top of the order in the Royal London One-Day Cup and he performs well under pressure. Another option is to promote Moeen Ali to open with Alex Hales and use Bairstow in the middle order. Moeen has done the job for England before but, nonetheless, I would have Jonny there.

When you're struggling, there is a part of you that wants to get out of the firing line. You know people will be talking about you when you're out there, wondering how much longer you've got. It's not a nice place to be and it can mean your mind is clouded when you are batting. You don't see the ball as well as you do when you're at your best and it becomes more difficult to make the correct decisions.

I don't know Roy well enough to know his approach when he is out of nick, but whenever I speak to young cricketers I advise on keeping notes. When you're playing well, write down what you're doing, so when you're playing poorly you can refer to it.

That's a tip Paul Nixon, the former England wicketkeeper, gave me when I was a young player at Leicestershire. I still have the notes on my phone: describing my ideal stance, my trigger movements when I'm playing well, my strongest shots. …

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