Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

'Grenfell Cladding Decision Killed My Son' Mother's Anger after Losing Her Unborn Child Following Fire

Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

'Grenfell Cladding Decision Killed My Son' Mother's Anger after Losing Her Unborn Child Following Fire

Article excerpt

Byline: Rashid Razaq

A MOTHER who lost her unborn child in the Grenfell Tower fire has told those responsible for installing cheaper cladding: "You killed my son."

Andreia Gomes, who was seven months' pregnant, and her husband Marcio managed to escape their home on the 21st floor with daughters Luana, 12, and Megan, 10.

Mrs Gomes, 37, and her daughters were placed in medically induced comas in King's College Hospital. She woke to learn that her unborn son, who she had already named Logan, had died. She said she felt deep anger towards whoever was responsible for deciding to place cheaper, less fireretardant cladding on the tower. "When you go ahead ignoring something like that I feel that you don't care. You just killed so many people and you just killed my son," she said. "Because in a normal situation I could have gone out and he could have survived. But because of the conditions, he passed away."

Medical discharge papers show Luana was diagnosed with cyanide poisoning, which may have been released by burning insulation or plastic during the fire. Mrs Gomes, Luana and Megan were all treated with a cyanide antidote, though only Luana had a confirmed diagnosis of cyanide poisoning the first such diagnosis of a Grenfell blaze victim.

Mrs Gomes said: "They [medical staff ] said they believed as the poison went in and settled in my body everything goes to the baby. After seven months the lungs of the baby start to develop. The amount that he received was enough to stop his heart."

Richard Hull, professor of fire science at University of Central Lancashire, told the BBC: "Plastic foam insulation is effectively made from crude oil and so it's going to combust in more or less the same way as any other petrochemical. It's got a lot of nitrogen in it and therefore when it burns it produces both carbon monoxide and hydrogen cyanide." Hundreds attended a vigil near the tower last night to mark a month since the fire. Tempers flared yesterday at a meeting between residents, police and Elizabeth Campbell, new leader of Kensington and Chelsea council. …

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