Newspaper article Daily Examiner (Grafton, Australia)

Crisis in Communication; More Children Turning Up with Language Disorders

Newspaper article Daily Examiner (Grafton, Australia)

Crisis in Communication; More Children Turning Up with Language Disorders

Article excerpt

Byline: Monique Hore

THE GROWING number of children who arrive at school unable to communicate with teachers and other children is a public health crisis as widespread as obesity, experts have warned.

The Murdoch Children's Research Institute has revealed developmental language disorder affects between 5-8% of children on average but the rate can be as high as 20% among disadvantaged children.

Children who cannot communicate properly because they lack the skills are at risk of poor literacy skills, mental health issues and unemployment.

Lead researcher Professor James Law, from Newcastle University, said it constituted a public health issue.

"The people who need the services most, least get them," he said.

"Our feedback is that children are turning up at school with really poor communication skills. Schools are trying to teach them communication at the same time they are trying to teach them their subjects."

A policy brief from the institute calls for kindergarten and early childhood teachers to be better trained to spot the disorder.

It also calls on parents and schools to promote language by reading, conversation, music and rhyme.

Research from Australia and overseas has shown, without intervention, children with a language disorder continue to struggle with literacy in their 30s.

About half of young male offenders on custodial sentences also have significant oral language difficulties.

Charles Sturt University's Dr Noella Mackenzie said students with the disorder often struggled in school because literacy underpinned every subject. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.