Newspaper article The Journal (Newcastle, England)

The Windsor Change; the House of Windsor Is Celebrating Its Centenary This Year. MARION MCMULLEN Checks out 100 Years of Royal Highs and Lows

Newspaper article The Journal (Newcastle, England)

The Windsor Change; the House of Windsor Is Celebrating Its Centenary This Year. MARION MCMULLEN Checks out 100 Years of Royal Highs and Lows

Article excerpt

Byline: MARION MCMULLEN

THE House of Windsor has seen four monarchs so far - George V, Edward VIII, George VI and the nation's longest reigning sovereign Elizabeth II.

But it also experienced the abdication crisis in 1936 when Edward VIII gave up the throne to marry Wallis Simpson. Edward VIII's reign lasted just 326 days - less than 11 months. He was never crowned.

Elizabeth II's reign has lasted more than 65 years. She overtook ancestor Queen Victoria to become the longest-serving British monarch on September 9 2015.

The German name Saxe-Coburg-Gotha came to the family in 1840 with the marriage of Queen Victoria to Prince Albert. Albert was born in Bavaria and was the younger son of the duke of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha.

Because of anti-German feeling during the First World War, George V - Albert's grandson and Elizabeth II's grandfather - issued a royal proclamation on July 17 1917, ditching Saxe-Coburg-Gotha and making the royal family "the House and Family of Windsor" and announcing that they would "relinquish and discontinue the use of all German Titles and Dignities."

The name Windsor - after the 11th century castle - was the final choice for the royal family, but other suggestions included Tudor-Stuart and Guelph, which was the Hanoverian name. It was Lord Stamfordham, the King's private secretary, who suggested Windsor. Windsor is the oldest and largest continually occupied castle in Europe and was built in the 11th century.

The Royal Mint has marked the historic anniversary of the House of Windsor with a commemorative PS5 coin which features Windsor Castle's Round Tower. Designed by Timothy Noad, it is based on the original badge approved by the Queen's father, George VI, in 1938. Among the commemorative coins available is A 22-carat Gold Proof Coin (PS1,935).

The Duke and Duchess of York (later King George VI and Queen Elizabeth) spent their honeymoon in 1923 at Polesden Lacey in Surrey. The coronation in 1937 was the first true outside broadcast and was captured on film using a mobile control van.

After Elizabeth II's accession in 1952, the Queen declared that the royal family's surname would still be Windsor and not Mountbatten, much to the Duke of Edinburgh's annoyance. …

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