Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

New Wave; Trends the Coolest Cossies Come with a Clear Conscience. Emma McCarthy on Why Sustainable Swimwear Is Making a Splash

Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

New Wave; Trends the Coolest Cossies Come with a Clear Conscience. Emma McCarthy on Why Sustainable Swimwear Is Making a Splash

Article excerpt

Byline: Emma McCarthy on

SHOPPING for swimwear is a perilous pursuit. Common questions which may arise while on your mission include: can I actually justify spending more on a bikini than I did on flights? Is a Brazilian cut only OK on Copacabana beach or Love Island? And will that neon colourblock cut-out one-piece bought in the sale three years ago ever seem like a good idea? But, while wrestling yourself into yet another little black Lycra number within the safe confines of a changing room, have you ever stopped to consider whether your swimmers are sustainable? As a deluge of brands championing cossies with a conscience means there's now more to scrutinise when bikini shopping than the potential for dodgy tan lines.

Leading the sustainable swim team this season is Auria London. Founded in 2013 by Central Saint Martins graduate Diana Auria, this boutique swimwear label, which counts Rihanna among its fans, champions a "from the sea, for the sea" approach with designs handmade in England from Econyl - a recycled fibre produced from discarded fishing nets. Among its current most popular styles are keyhole halterneck one-pieces, sporty mesh crop tops and high-waisted string bikinis in sunny shades of lemon, cherry and sugar pink. The brand has also previously teamed up with Sony to create a travel accessories collection of beach sliders, sunglass cases and passport-holders made from recycled headphone wires, and last year, Selfridges named Auria one of its Bright New Things in a project designed to promote sustainable fashion brands in the UK. In line with its dedication to add momentum to retail's turning tide, the department store is also in the seventh year of its Project Ocean venture an initiative which has involved removing all plastic bags and water bottles from its stores, as well as beauty products containing plastic microbeads, in a bid to reduce the eight million tonnes of plastic pollution that is dumped in the ocean every year. …

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