Newspaper article The Journal (Newcastle, England)

I've Spent Too Many Years Being Angry and Upset and against Things. Now I Believe in Love and Forgiveness. She's One of Today's Most In-Demand Stars, but Noomi Rapace's Journey to Hollywood Has Been Far from Plain Sailing. the Star Tells GEMMA DUNN How, despite Hardships, She Fought Hard to Make Her Dream a Reality ON THE Small SCREEN

Newspaper article The Journal (Newcastle, England)

I've Spent Too Many Years Being Angry and Upset and against Things. Now I Believe in Love and Forgiveness. She's One of Today's Most In-Demand Stars, but Noomi Rapace's Journey to Hollywood Has Been Far from Plain Sailing. the Star Tells GEMMA DUNN How, despite Hardships, She Fought Hard to Make Her Dream a Reality ON THE Small SCREEN

Article excerpt

Byline: GEMMA DUNN

SINCE making a name for herself in the Swedish film adaptations of Stieg Larsson's Millennium series - which kicked off with The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo - life has changed tenfold for Noomi Rapace.

In eight short years, the actress - who was nominated for a Bafta for her portrayal of anti-heroine Lisbeth Salander - has gone from hardly speaking any English to carving out a career as one of Hollywood's most bankable stars.

It's a transformation that even she herself finds hard to comprehend.

"I feel very blessed," whispers Noomi, her CV serving as a go-to guide for gritty action flicks, including Dead Man Down, The Drop and Ridley Scott's blockbuster hit Prometheus.

"You know if you would've seen me maybe 15 years ago, I didn't think I would be alive today. My life has changed a lot, and I've changed a lot," confides the 37-year-old.

"(Now) I'm working with the most amazing, incredible people in my industry," she adds. "I still get shy, I'm still in awe. I meet people who want to work with me and I can't really understand how that happened and when it happened... But I'm very humble and I don't take anything for granted."

Holed up in a hotel, Swedish-born Noomi - sporting leather trousers, a Victoriana blouse matched with Chanel beads and a punky blonde crop - has only been back in London for 10 days, having just wrapped Stockholm, a thriller based on the capital's infamous 1973 hostage crisis.

As she struggles to put one character aside ("I'm not going back to myself, I need to find a new me because I always change"), she's ready to talk about another. Or seven, in fact, for her impressive stint in Netflix original film What Happened To Monday? A dystopian thriller set in the not-so-distant questioning the kind of world we're living in.

"If we don't start to be more responsible and more aware of the consequences of our actions, we can end up in a pretty bad situation soon," she reasons, taken by the premise.

"It's interesting, my son is very aware of the environment. He's tried to convince me to get an electric car, and he doesn't want to have beef in our house because of political reasons...," Noomi says, beaming with pride at the mere mention of her 13-year-old (her only child with ex-husband Ola Rapace).

"I think the younger generation are more aware and they are responsible," she follows. "He's very aware of stuff and he's already fighting for a better world."

Does she worry for him growing up in uncertain times? "I try not to," she retorts. "We live in a world where so much destruction (is) happening, it's hard to take in.

"My heart is just breaking every day, so I decided a couple of years ago to focus on what I believe in and what I want and what I find beautiful. "I've spent too many years of my life being angry and fighting and being upset and being against things," she declares, head in hands.

"I was very fearless but on the edge of just stupidity, and I'm fighting a different war now. …

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