Newspaper article Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England)

My MS Isn't Right for the Pioneering Treatment I Want, the NHS Says, So I'm Hoping to Get to India; Mum-of-Two Fundraising to Travel for Stem Cell Therapy after Health Chiefs Say It Doesn't Suit All Patients

Newspaper article Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England)

My MS Isn't Right for the Pioneering Treatment I Want, the NHS Says, So I'm Hoping to Get to India; Mum-of-Two Fundraising to Travel for Stem Cell Therapy after Health Chiefs Say It Doesn't Suit All Patients

Article excerpt

Byline: MICHAEL MUNCASTER Reporter michael.muncaster@trinitymirror.com @MichaelMjourno

NEWLY married and ready for family life, Susan Timlin had everything to live for.

But her world came crashing down after she was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS).

The mum-of-two has been battling the debilitating condition for more than 30 years, which has left her isolated and often too ill to get out of bed. Now her family is hoping to raise PS35,000 to send her to fatigue from. It enhance of Susan's India for lifechanging treatment, which she is not eligible to receive in the UK.

Her sister Therese, 53, said: "It has been tough watching her but over the last couple of years she has been getting progressively worse.

"She is in terrible and constant pain; things are looking very bleak for her. We hope the treatment could make a big difference." As a youngster, Therese said her sister was full of energy and loved life.

she suffers greatly her quality life Therese But in the early 20s, she was forced to give up her job as a bank clerk after being diagnosed with MS.

Gradually over the years, Susan, now 56 and from Ashington, lost her mobility and the debilitating condition means she feels constantly ill.

Therese, of Morpeth, said: "Susan had to give up work and has become more isolated over the years. She relies on social media to keep in touch with the outside world because she is often too ill to see people.

"True to herself, she makes the best of what she has and tries hard to be upbeat and positive, even in a situation which would have broken most of us."

Susan's heart soared when she became aware of a radical therapy known as autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplantation, or AHSCT.

The treatment sees patients given a drug that encourages stem cells to move from the bone marrow into the blood stream, and these cells are then removed from the body. …

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