Newspaper article The Daily Mercury (Mackay, Australia)

The Dark Secret's out; Blade Runner 2049 Takes Up the Story 30 Years after the Original

Newspaper article The Daily Mercury (Mackay, Australia)

The Dark Secret's out; Blade Runner 2049 Takes Up the Story 30 Years after the Original

Article excerpt

Blade Runner 2049

Stars: Harrison Ford, Ryan Gosling, Ana de Armas, Jared Leto, Dave Bautista, Robin Wright.

Director: Denis Villeneuve

Rating: MA 15+

Reviewer's last word: Beautifully filmed and well cast, this is a sequel worth the 35-year wait.

Star profile: Ryan Gosling

Quirky fact: Is an accomplished jazz guitarist and a fan of Chet Baker. He started a band with his friend Zach Shields called Dead Man's Bones.

Best known for: La La Land, Drive, The Notebook.

If you like this movie you'll like these: Arrival, Sicario, Blade Runner.

Quote: "I always wanted to entertain. When I was six, a scrawny, scrawny kid, I'd get in my red Speedo and do muscle moves. I actually thought I was muscular. I didn't know everyone was laughing at me."

SCREEN LIFE

with Seanna Cronin

ONE of the most highly anticipated films of the year, Blade Runner 2049, returns to Ridley Scott's gritty, dystopian version of Los Angeles. Set three decades after the events of the 1982 film, this long-awaited sequel follows young blade runner Officer K's (Ryan Gosling) discovery of a long-buried secret.

His quest for answers forces him to track down former blade runner Rick Deckard (Harrison Ford), who has been missing for 30 years. In this Q&A, Ryan Gosling talks about Blade Runner's legacy, his new character and working with Harrison Ford.

Q: Do you remember what your first impressions were of the first Blade Runner?

A: I was about 14 years old, which I think was 12 years after the original had come out. So I think my first impression was just the realisation of how influential it had been on so much of what I had grown up watching and listening to.

Q: Why do you think the film still has cult status today?

A: The film is haunting. It's hard to shake. It asks you to question your idea of what it means to be human. It makes you question your ability to recognise the hero from the villain. It's a nightmarish vision of the future that's somehow grounded and real and feels possible, and yet it's presented in this sort of romantic dreamlike way; so that sticks with you. Time has kind of proven its specialness. …

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