Newspaper article Evening Gazette (Middlesbrough, England)

SECRETS OF THE ROYALS; ADVERTISING FEATURE Fascinating New TV Series Reveals Shocking Facts about Past Monarchs Involving Sex, Drugs, Pimping and Extreme Gluttony

Newspaper article Evening Gazette (Middlesbrough, England)

SECRETS OF THE ROYALS; ADVERTISING FEATURE Fascinating New TV Series Reveals Shocking Facts about Past Monarchs Involving Sex, Drugs, Pimping and Extreme Gluttony

Article excerpt

For centuries, their lives have been shrouded in secrecy. But now, a new series promises to lift the lid on the Royal ancestors - and reveal what really went on behind palace walls.

Queen Victoria took drugs Opium was the drug of choice for many people in the 19th century, and Queen Victoria was no exception. But while most opium the substance, users would smoke Victoria instead chose to drink it as a tincture dissolved in alcohol.

In addition, she described as "hugely enjoyable" the chloroform she took during childbirth, and she took laudanum too.

The Prince Regent was a greedy eater Later to become King George IV, the Prince Regent was known for being something of an overeater. So much so that, without his corset, his tummy was said to droop down to his knees. The greatest meal of his Regency, the Regent's Banquet, was held in 1817 at the Royal Pavilion, Brighton to mark the visit of the Grand Duke Nicholas of Russia. Chef Marie-Antoine Careme created 127 dishes including the Royal Pavilion rendered in pastry.

Henry VIII was a brilliant tennis player The legendary monarch's tennis skills have been described by Lesley Ronaldson, real tennis historian, as "probably world class". She says: "Henry would play for money and to show that he could win." Even Henry's second wife Anne Boleyn was a fan, and was watching a game of tennis when she was arrested.

King George III never cheated Given that his 1761 marriage to Charlotte was arranged, and he'd never met her before the day of the wedding, the fact that George stayed faithful was remarkable. Historian Tracy Borman says: "Their happy marriage that lasted for 57 years and produced 16 children."

King Charles II brought back Christmas During the English Civil War in the 1640s, while King Charles I was battling for his crown, Parliament was becoming increasingly radical in the way it governed the country. Concerned by the exuberance which marked Christmas and its perceived association with the old Catholic faith, by 1647 Parliament had declared the celebration of Christmas to be a punishable offence. …

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