Newspaper article The Morning Bulletin (Rockhampton, Australia)

The Beauty of the Sturt's Desert Pea; Weekender Columnist Neil Fisher Is from Fisher's Nursery, North Rockhampton. You Can Chat with Neil on Radio 4ro's Gardening Hour after the 6am News on Tuesdays

Newspaper article The Morning Bulletin (Rockhampton, Australia)

The Beauty of the Sturt's Desert Pea; Weekender Columnist Neil Fisher Is from Fisher's Nursery, North Rockhampton. You Can Chat with Neil on Radio 4ro's Gardening Hour after the 6am News on Tuesdays

Article excerpt

DID YOU KNOW?

Next Wednesday is Queensland Day and what you may not know is the history of Queensland's floral emblem and the plants that could have been the Queensland floral emblem.

The Euphorbia pulcherrima or Poinsettia was almost the floral emblem of Queensland, it was already the floral emblem of Brisbane.

In 1959 just before Queensland's Centenary it was decided to conduct a poll for a floral emblem for the state.

Plants like Grevillea banksii or Red Silky Oak, Schefflera actinophylla or Umbrella Tree, Stenocarpus sinuatus or Wheel of Fire where all nominated with the Euphorbia pulcherrima.

Thankfully the Dendrobium phalaenopsis or Cooktown Orchid won and was proclaimed on November 19, 1959 as our states floral emblem.

The Grevillea banksii voted second and the Euphorbia pulcherrima finished third.

GARDENING in Western Queensland can have numerous challengers but then there are times that I am envious of the array of unique plant species that can be grown in Barcaldine, Blackall, Longreach or Winton. One plant that I would love to have in my garden would be the Sturt's Desert Pea.

The Sturt's Desert Pea or Swainsona formosa was formerly called Clianthus formosus and is soon to be known as Willdampia formosa. Confused? This plant is the official floral emblem of South Australia's and was named for Charles Sturt who headed a number of expeditions into Australia's arid interior in the mid 1800's.

The Sturt's Desert Pea is a prostate, rambling plant with soft grey green foliage. In the right position the Sturt's Desert Pea can cover over two square metres. It is the flower that the Sturt's Desert Pea is known for, the striking blood red flowers with prominent black bumps in the middle of the flower. There are number of hybrids on the market in dryland areas of Australia with flower colours from white through to red and many shades of pink in between. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.