Newspaper article Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England)

Seven Months of Misery, but We're Told: Things Can Only Get Better; Work Due to Start within Weeks on One of Tyneside's Busiest Roads

Newspaper article Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England)

Seven Months of Misery, but We're Told: Things Can Only Get Better; Work Due to Start within Weeks on One of Tyneside's Busiest Roads

Article excerpt

Byline: CRAIG THOMPSON Reporter craig.thompson@ncjmedia.com

WORK is due to start within weeks on revamping one of Tyneside's busiest trunk roads - leaving drivers facing seven months of motoring misery.

The essential repair work on Heworth roundabout in Gateshead, is expected to have a significant impact on traffic and the 42,000 motorists who use the route every day and they are being warned to prepare themselves in advance.

The works which start on January 28 will mean: |the A184 Felling Bypass either side of Heworth roundabout will be reduced to a single lane in EACH direction | occasional full road closures at nights and at week-ends as required |the A185 Shields Road between Heworth roundabout and the Maiden Over pub will be closed, affecting local traffic, and |the route between Heworth roundabout and Sunderland Road will also be closed, affecting local traffic.

There is some good news for bus users and commuters: | bus lanes will remain operational, and |Low Heworth Lane, with its access to Heworth North long-stay car park, will remain open/ The work is expected to take between six and seven months and structural engineers say it is essential. It was originally scheduled to start in September, but was delayed.

The roundabout, which is supported on a series of concrete bridges which carry the road over the Network Rail and Metro lines, has been causing structural engineers serious concern after they detected water seeping into the bridge structures last year. If left unchecked, this water could cause serious and irreparable structural damage to the bridges.

The major risk is 'spalling' which occurs when water seeps into concrete and causes the steel reinforcing rods within the concrete to rust. The rusting process causes the rods to expand, cracking the concrete around them and severely weakening its structural strength. …

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