Newspaper article The Journal (Newcastle, England)

Mending Your Fences Richard Burr Offers Some Expert Advice for Getting the Job Done; Richard Burr Offers Some Expert Advice for Getting the Job Done

Newspaper article The Journal (Newcastle, England)

Mending Your Fences Richard Burr Offers Some Expert Advice for Getting the Job Done; Richard Burr Offers Some Expert Advice for Getting the Job Done

Article excerpt

encing can be a rewarding pastime. I'm putting up a new one - and so can you with my top tips!

FWhat you'll need: gloves; a crowbar; claw hammer; shovel; panel saw; rake; spirit level; post hole digger; some string; breaker; 2x 1 meter lengths of 50x100mm wood; watering can, or bucket; short piece of batten; a few bricks for propping up; tape measure; grinder.

OUT WITH THE OLD As a rule of thumb, the fence to the left of your home as you face it is the one you're responsible for. If in doubt, check the HM Land Registry website. Be sure you tell your neighbour you're putting up a new fence, and then it's time to get clearing.

MARKING OUT AND SETTING UP Start in one corner of your garden and mark a hole in exactly the right place, as this will set the boundary line for the whole fence.

Use a post hole digger (such as a Roughneck Fibreglass Post-Hole Digger, PS39.99, Screwfix.com) to start cutting away the ground in a square about 25-30cm round.

Cut this hole neatly so as not to waste concrete. If the old posts or their concrete bases are still in place they will have to come out. You may need to hire a breaker for this (a Hilti TE3000 Heavy Duty Breaker from HSS Hire is PS88.44 per day).

Make the hole 600mm deep for a 6ft fence to be sure it's secure.

PUTTING UP THE FENCE Put the first post into the hole, making sure the groove points down the line your fence will take. Level it with a spirit level. Prop the post in place.

Set the post with quick-setting postcrete. Start by half filling the hole around the post with water, then pour the postcrete powder in.

Use a wooden baton to knock out any air bubbles that form, and continue filling with water until the concrete comes to within an inch of the surface.

Leave for 10-20 mins to set before continuing. Once your first post is in place, use the same method to set a post at the far end. Tie a string line to one post, about 30cm from the ground, pull it to the other one and tie it off. Make sure the string doesn't touch the ground as it is stretched across your garden.

Tie more string between the top of the two posts, so you have a height guide for the rest of the posts. …

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