Newspaper article The Morning Bulletin (Rockhampton, Australia)

My Life of Silent Pain; CQ Mother's Invisible Hurt Forced Child to Grow Up Fast

Newspaper article The Morning Bulletin (Rockhampton, Australia)

My Life of Silent Pain; CQ Mother's Invisible Hurt Forced Child to Grow Up Fast

Article excerpt

Byline: Steph Allen Stephanie.Allen@capnews.com.au

PAIN REPORT

One quarter would not inform their colleagues of any pain.

30% said they would conceal their pain from close friends.

More than one in 10 could keep their pain hidden from a spouse.

A third of sufferers feel judged at work if they take a sick day.

More than half choose to deal with the pain instead of taking leave.

A quarter of people survey said they would not inform their colleagues of any pain.

One in five Queenslanders know someone who suffers from pain.

BEEANKHA Belcher knows well the pain of living with an "invisible" illness.

From a young age, the Zilzie resident regularly suffered migraines and back pain, unaware so many like her were dealing with the same daily struggle.

Eight in 10 Queenslanders are living with pain, according to an Amcal Pharmacy survey which highlights the struggles of ongoing pain, and the fight sufferers endure to make their voices heard amidst new codeine regulation.

After falling out of a car on a main highway aged three, Ms Belcher, 24, has dealt with constant pain.

"I've had back pain ever since I could remember,"

she said. "I could never eat my food quick because I would get back pain, and sitting or standing for too long; I'd get back pain."

After giving birth to her daughter Emily in 2015, she found her back would give out on her "out of the blue".

Ms Belcher said she dealt with migraines throughout her teenage years as a result of her depression.

"All the doctors did for me was give me a piece of paper all about migraines and headaches and I have had an X-ray done on my back and a head scan," she said.

"Nothing came back bad, and I don't know how many times I've been to see different doctors about the same things. The doctors just left it at that."

Back pain, muscular pain and migraine sufferers claim their conditions still aren't taken seriously, but they make up more than three quarters of Queensland's "invisible illness" population. …

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