Newspaper article Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England)

Gone within Days of Being Struck by Alabama Rot; Much-Loved Family Pet Killed by Terrifying Condition

Newspaper article Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England)

Gone within Days of Being Struck by Alabama Rot; Much-Loved Family Pet Killed by Terrifying Condition

Article excerpt

Byline: CHRIS KNIGHT Reporter christopher.knight@trinitymirror.com @C_M_Knight

DEADLY dog disease Alabama Rot has claimed the life of yet another muchloved family pet.

Bought as a birthday present for fiveyear-old May Diehl, Pearl quickly became part of the family.

But just 18 months on, dad Grant and his heartbroken family have had to say their final goodbyes to her as Alabama Rot claimed the Labrador. Grant, from Sacriston, County Durham, is now urging others to be vigilant for signs of the killer condition.

He said: "Pearl was going to be May's friend to take her through junior school.

"She was going to be there for her for the next 10 years. They were best pals - we have all lost a member of the family.

"If you notice something strange about your dog, take them to the vet and ask if it could be Alabama Rot. I would hate for anyone else to go through this."

Alabama Rot was first found in Britain in 2012, and it is believed more than 100 dogs have since died of it.

The disease, officially called cutaneous and renal glomerular vasculopathy, can affect all breeds, and its cause is still unknown. Grant, who used to take 12-year-old Labrador Amber and Pearl for daily walks in Sacriston Wood, first noticed Pearl was limping and struggling to put weight on her right front leg on Wednesday, January 24.

She was taken to Vets4Pets in Framwellgate Moor on the Friday with a swollen toe and issued with a course of antibiotics.

It was not until the following Monday when X-rays confirmed the cause of Pearl's suffering was not a fracture.

Grant, 36, said: "She could not really put any weight down on her right leg, and she would not get out of bed.

We only for a limp, had to down. so Grant "There were no skin lesions which is usually the first sign of Alabama Rot.

"Even on the Monday morning, I was expecting to pick her up later that day.

"It was that afternoon they said her kidneys were not functioning as they should be."

Once suspicions of Alabama Rot were raised, Pearl was moved for more specialist treatment at Wear Referrals in Bradbury.

But such was the spread of the disease, vets were left with no choice but to put the Labrador down last Wednesday morning. …

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