Newspaper article Evening Gazette (Middlesbrough, England)

Films Provide a Lot of Great Roles for Men, Not So Much for Women; Fed Up of Playing Wives or Girlfriends, Carey Mulligan Is Shunning Tinseltown in Favour of Well-Rounded Roles on TV. It's Where the Good Writing Is, She Tells GEMMA DUNN

Newspaper article Evening Gazette (Middlesbrough, England)

Films Provide a Lot of Great Roles for Men, Not So Much for Women; Fed Up of Playing Wives or Girlfriends, Carey Mulligan Is Shunning Tinseltown in Favour of Well-Rounded Roles on TV. It's Where the Good Writing Is, She Tells GEMMA DUNN

Article excerpt

Byline: GEMMA DUNN

CAREY Mulligan is just one of many Hollywood starlets returning to the small screen - and with good reason.

She will take the lead in BBC2's new mini series, Collateral, and contends TV now offers more stimulating roles for woman.

"For most the actresses I know, it's been about going where the better writing is," she says.

"Films tend to provide a lot for men, in terms of great leading roles, and not so much for women.

"So you can do Big Little Lies and have four to six extraordinary roles written for women, where there'd be maybe one or half of one in a couple of films."

Carey adds: "I just want to play the most interesting, complicated, real person. And interesting, complicated, real people in film are really rare."

Refusing to simply "wait around", the British talent's latest outing ticks all the boxes.

Joining forces with the likes of John Simm, Nicola Walker and Billie Piper for Collateral, the 32-year-old plays a detective in the Sir David Harepenned political thriller.

Set over the course of four days, the four-part drama explores the spiralling repercussions surrounding the fatal shooting of a London-based pizza delivery man - and the refusal of tough Detective Inspector Kip Glaspie (Carey) to accept it is a random act of senseless violence.

Politician David Mars (Simm), his unpredictable ex-wife (Piper) and local vicar Jane Oliver (Walker) all find their lives turned upside down by the incident.

It's the second time Carey has worked with playwright Hare (the first was her Tony-nominated portrayal of Kyra in the Broadway revival of Skylight), and she's only too happy to reconvene.

Carey as in "The character I played in Skylight was one of my favourite characters, and so, now, is Kip," she says.

"Often women are encouraged to be amenable, likeable characters and these women are much more than that. They have so much going on, which is really exciting."

But Carey was set to shape her character in a way even she hadn't anticipated.

"When this [script] came my way, I said, 'Oh my goodness, I really, really want to do it, but I am five weeks pregnant!"' reveals the now-mother of two, who was also expecting with musician husband Marcus Mumford during her run on Skylight.

"[David] was totally happy and said he didn't see why Kip couldn't be pregnant," she explains. "He barely changed a thing and only added two references to the pregnancy in the entire show.

"There was no 'Argh, goodness me, he kicked' and all that stuff," she says with a laugh. "No pregnant acting was allowed and no crying, which was a revelation for me because I constantly cry!

Maud Suffragette "I love that because pregnant women don't go around all day clutching their bellies. …

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