Newspaper article The Journal (Newcastle, England)

May's 'Five Tests' Will Guide Brexit Strategy

Newspaper article The Journal (Newcastle, England)

May's 'Five Tests' Will Guide Brexit Strategy

Article excerpt

Byline: Jonathan Walker Political Editor jon.walker@trinitymirror.com @jonwalker121

PRIME Minister Theresa May is to set out five "tests" that will guide the UK's negotiations with the EU in the run-up to Brexit, in a major speech.

Mrs May will say she wants the "broadest and deepest" trade agreement possible - with more co-operation than any trade agreement already operating in the world today.

And she will insist her ambitious plan is achievable, because it is in the EU's interest too.

The Prime Minister will say: "I believe that is achievable because it is in the EU's interests as well as ours and because of our unique starting point, where on day one we both have the same laws and rules.

People "So rather than having to bring two different systems closer together, the task will be to manage the relationship once we are two separate legal systems."

to have and relationship with " Her comments suggest the UK could continue to have many of the same rules and laws as the EU even after Brexit, although Mrs May will also stress that the UK must "take control of our borders, laws and money".

It had been reported that the widely anticipated speech, titled "Our Future Partnership", would take place in the North East. However, the venue has been changed as a result of weather conditions making the journey from London unfeasible.

Mrs May will say the first of her five tests is to ensure the agreement with the EU respects the result of the 2016 referendum, which she will argue was a vote for the UK to take back control as well as a vote for "wider change", so that no community in Britain is "left behind again".

Secondly, she will stress that the agreement with the EU must be permanent. She will say: "After Brexit both the UK and the EU want to forge ahead with building a better future for our people, not find ourselves back at the negotiating table because things have broken down."

The third test is that the agreement "must protect people's jobs and security," she will say. …

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