Newspaper article News Mail Bundaberg Qld.

Embracing Every Difference; Bundy Mum Gaining Traction with New Autism Blog

Newspaper article News Mail Bundaberg Qld.

Embracing Every Difference; Bundy Mum Gaining Traction with New Autism Blog

Article excerpt

Byline: Carly Morrissey

AMY Iacullo describes herself as your typical mum.

The former Bundy girl is raising three kids, helping her husband run a business and now has started a blog to help other mums with autistic children.

The blog went live two weeks ago, already has a lot of media attention and is gaining new followers every day.

Her oldest Romeo, 4, was diagnosed with autism aged 3.

While Mrs Iacullo now lives in Canberra, her family still lives in Bundaberg, she was married in Burnett Heads and went to St Luke's.

She decided to share her family's journey with autism publicly after running the blog from her private Instagram for more than a year.

With 1000 followers on Instagram it became too hard to answer everyone's messages and so she has moved to Facebook.

The blog started as a way to show other mothers of autistic children that they weren't alone.

"Mums feel so alone," she said.

"I found when you go through the really rough days it's hard to look after your own mental health as a mum."

There were so many educational tools available, she said, as well as therapies but she just wanted to know if there was anyone else facing the same challenges and couldn't find anything apart from an American blog.

Mrs Iacullo had moved from Bundaberg to Sydney and was managing a photography studio before having Romeo.

Romeo was falling behind and the Iacullos decided to move to Canberra and put their family first.

Mrs Iacullo gave up her job and started to look after Romeo full time, then he was diagnosed.

Before that people would say he doesn't speak because he watches too much YouTube or because he wasn't read enough books, or because his mother worked too much.

But now the family knows he's just different.

"I blamed myself for a really long time," she said.

Thankfully everyday autism is becoming more socially acceptable. …

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