Newspaper article Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England)

'Overly Restrictive' Care Home Slammed; DISABLED RESIDENTS WERE NOT ALLOWED TO SEE FRIENDS

Newspaper article Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England)

'Overly Restrictive' Care Home Slammed; DISABLED RESIDENTS WERE NOT ALLOWED TO SEE FRIENDS

Article excerpt

Byline: Katie Dickinson Reporter katie.dickinson@trinitymirror.com @KATIEJDICKINSON

THE "restrictive" practices of a former care home manager who refused to allow disabled residents to see their friends or "freely move around" have been revealed in a new report.

Staff at Abbeymoor Neurodisability Centre in Newcastle were "told not to allow people to freely access the community, have access to keypad numbers or independently access drinks" under the former regime, according to a report by the Care Quality Commission (CQC).

The "restrictive and unacceptable" practices were uncovered after an investigation by the service provider Lifeways, and the findings have now been published in a CQC report.

By the time CQC inspectors visited the Swalwell home in January this year, the registered manager had left and a regional operations director had been working there since November 2017.

Their inspection report acknowledged that improvements were being made but highlighted worries that none of the staff had raised concerns or alerts about the "overly restrictive" practices under the former manager.

The CQC have now put the service in special measures after rating it 'inadequate' following the inspection.

The centre looks after up to 40 people with degenerative neurological conditions or an acquired brain injury.

The CQC report said that in September last year local authority commissioners raised "a number of concerns around the operation of the service".

It said: "The provider had found that over the preceding four years, although two other providers had operated the service, the previous registered manager had expected staff to work in very restrictive and unacceptable ways with people.

"They and care managers had found that staff were told not to allow people to freely access the community, have access to keypad numbers within the service or to see their friends or independently access drinks.

"They have been taking action to deal with this but recognise that the culture within the service needed to change."

At the time of the visit, the registered manager had not been working at the home since September 2017. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.