Newspaper article The Daily Mercury (Mackay, Australia)

Gone to the Dogs; Fur Flies as Anderson's Return Puts Charming Tails on the Screen

Newspaper article The Daily Mercury (Mackay, Australia)

Gone to the Dogs; Fur Flies as Anderson's Return Puts Charming Tails on the Screen

Article excerpt

Byline: WORDS: SEANNA CRONIN

Wes Anderson returns with Isle of Dogs, the follow-up to his Oscar-winning film The Grand Budapest Hotel.

The director builds upon the textural puppets and stop-motion animation he used to great effect in Fantastic Mr Fox. He's lined up another all-star cast including Bryan Cranston, Bill Murray and Edward Norton for this tale of a boy in search of his dog.

Q: Where did this idea begin?

A: Well, it starts with two ideas. I had this idea for some years that I wanted to do a second stop-motion animated film. I'd done one before, Fantastic Mr Fox. I wanted to do one that was dogs and I had this thought of a group of alpha dogs, named Chief, Duke, Boss and King, that they were living on a garbage dump.

I brought this to Jason Schwartzman and Roman Coppola, two of my closest friends, and we've worked together before on other stories. We started talking about it as something to write together. We had talked before about wanting to do something in Japan and we sort of smashed these two things together. We've made a movie with a Japanese setting without going to Japan. The movie is actually filmed in East London, in a place called Bromley-by-Bow.

Q: It's not just Japanese, but retro future Japanese?

A: At one point we had made a particularly complicated set-up for it, which was our initial opening where the narrator said, "The year is 2007, the city of Megasaki has been transformed by..." And it then portrayed that it was the future, and you were supposed to eventually get that the movie is actually made in the early '60s. Which starts to become kind of hard to grasp.

Q: Atari is a sweet central character in the film. How did you conceive of him?

A: The Atari we wrote, we had an idea for a boy who was extremely determined; defiant but soft spoken and slightly losing his mind. He'd been in a plane crash, he's been through trauma that I think in an animated movie, in a movie like ours, his trauma can be treated a bit lightly. …

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