Newspaper article The Chronicle (Toowoomba, Australia)

Creating Big Impact in a Small Garden; the Simple Secrets to Blending Indoors and Out

Newspaper article The Chronicle (Toowoomba, Australia)

Creating Big Impact in a Small Garden; the Simple Secrets to Blending Indoors and Out

Article excerpt

THE Australian way of life is synonymous with outdoor living, and nowhere is this more prevalent than in the home: Think alfresco entertaining, lush gardens, summer barbecues and poolside fun.

Yet, as high-density living becomes the norm in inner-city areas, we're seeing a shift to smaller, lower-maintenance gardens.

Adam Robinson, who launched his own landscape design business precisely to cater to this shift in the market, goes by the philosophy 'better garden, bigger life' for all his projects.

In his view, bigger gardens aren't always the best.

When Adam first began his career in landscape design, after starting out in construction, he noticed an irritating pattern emerging within the landscaping world.

"I was seeing a real disconnect from interiors to exteriors," he explains.

So, it was back to design school for Adam, this time studying interior design. This education allowed Adam to apply his landscaping design skills with a new focus, merging interior and exterior design principles to create wholly functional, useable and inviting outdoor spaces.

"It's important to draw colour tone and texture from architecture and interiors and blend these elements into your outdoor space," Adam says.

For smaller urban spaces, this concept is especially important, as there's often no lawn, pool or bridging divider between the indoors and outdoors.

In such cases, a balcony, rooftop or courtyard really becomes an extension of the home, another room in the apartment or house.

So, how do you carry the interior connection through to an outdoor space?

First, you need a seamless flow. Large sliding doors or floor-to-ceiling windows looking onto your courtyard or balcony will do the trick, Adam says.

In the space itself, it's about creating the cosiness and warmth you've come to expect from your indoor spaces: "I believe it's just as important to have good styling as it is a good design," Adam says. …

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