Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

At Last, a Leader I Can Do Business with Trump Seals Kim Deal; 'We're Prepared to Start a New History between Our nations'Trump Signs Deal with Kim after Five Hours of Talks but Concedes Dictator Is 'Tough and Korea Situation Is Rough'

Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

At Last, a Leader I Can Do Business with Trump Seals Kim Deal; 'We're Prepared to Start a New History between Our nations'Trump Signs Deal with Kim after Five Hours of Talks but Concedes Dictator Is 'Tough and Korea Situation Is Rough'

Article excerpt

Byline: Nicholas Cecil Deputy Political Editor

DONALD TRUMP hailed a "new history" today after signing a deal with Kim Jong-un aimed at putting America and North Korea on a path to peace.

The two leaders held nearly five hours of talks at an unprecedented summit in Singapore. The agreement, intended to rid the Korean Peninsula of nuclear weapons, was a gamble for the US president.

Brushing aside warnings that Kim could ultimately fail to ditch the pariah state's nuclear arsenal, Mr Trump said: "Our eyes are wide open but peace is always worth the effort."

He also announced that US-led military exercises, or "war games", to counter the North Korean threat would be Continued on Page 4 Continued from Page 1 called off, though economic sanctions would remain for the time being.

With a historic handshake, praise and smiles, the two men turned their backs on the war of words which appeared to be pushing the two countries towards conflict last year.

"We're prepared to start a new history, and we're ready to write a new chapter between our two nations," the US president said. "We dream of a future where all Koreans can live together in harmony where the light of peace chases away the darkness of war."

Mr Trump, who claimed he had not slept for 25 hours, described the North Korean leader as a "great personality", "talented" and a "very worthy, very smart negotiator".

Pressed on whether he was legitimising a brutal tyrant, who has executed members of his own family and has thrown thousands of people into labour camps, Mr Trump conceded that Kim ran his regime "tough" and that the situation in North Korea was "rough". He said that they had discussed human rights briefly and that the issue would be pursued in the future.

Mr Trump described the talks as "hon?est, direct and productive", which contrasted with his criticism of Canadian prime minister Justin Trudeau after the trade row at the G7 meeting.

He said he would invite the North Korean leader to visit the White House at the "appropriate time", that Mr Kim had accepted the offer, and he was open to going to Pyongyang himself.

Diplomatic experts were quick to play down the agreement, in which: North Korea reaffirmed its commitment,.

made on April 27 in the Panmunjom Declaration with South Korea, to work toward complete denuclearisation of the Korean Peninsula. This falls short, however, of Washington's demand for "complete, verifiable and irreversible" denuclearisation.

.The US and North Korea will "join their efforts" to build a lasting and stable peace regime on the Korean Peninsula -- short of a peace treaty being sought by Pyongyang to formally end the Korean War.

There is no timetable for denuclearisation.

..

The US offered to provide security guarantees to the reclusive state, though there were no details.

.America and North Korea committed to recovering the remains of prisoners ?of war and those missing in action, including the immediate repatriation of those already identified. …

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