Newspaper article The Journal (Newcastle, England)

TRUMP'S IN FAVOUR OF UN CONTROL; Improved Relations with North Korea Are to Be Welcomed, but Is Halt on Missile Tests Enough for Trump to Declare This Summit a Success?

Newspaper article The Journal (Newcastle, England)

TRUMP'S IN FAVOUR OF UN CONTROL; Improved Relations with North Korea Are to Be Welcomed, but Is Halt on Missile Tests Enough for Trump to Declare This Summit a Success?

Article excerpt

Byline: StatesideWith US Editor Christopher Bucktin

Below: South Koreans celebrate the TV pictures of the meeting TWO unpredictable egomaniacs meeting in Singapore was a long-shot for a nuclear deal, but as Winston Churchill once said, jaw-jaw is always better than war-war.

Donald Trump and Kim Jong-un coming together for their on-off-on talks had the potential to be a complete disaster or an unlikely amazing success - what we got was a welcome development somewhere in between.

The wording of a document signed by the two schoolground bullies fell some way short of the dramatic denuclearisation claim Trump made at the end of the historic meeting.

He described it as a "very comprehensive" agreement that would "take care of a very big and very dangerous problem for the world".

Cynics would say the five-hour meeting proved to be little more than a meeting about having more meetings, but for the first time the States has a very real diplomatic relationship with North Korea.

After more than a year of venomous barbs and apocalyptic threats of war, the summit between the two men was indeed a relief, with its handshakes and courtesy.

Trump deserves credit for setting in motion a process that, for the time being, will keep the two former enemies talking to each other.

But he should hold off creating a space for the Nobel Peace Prize on the White House mantelpiece just yet.

The statement he signed with Kim was strikingly thin on real action, with little evidence of any substantial progress, despite his claims. The document does not differ greatly from the agreement issued by Kim and the South Korean president, Moon Jae-in, after their meeting on the southern side of the demilitarised zone at the end of April.

The truth is, Kim and Trump were never going to appear in Singapore and sign a peace treaty.

China and South Korea would need to attend for such a development, and far more time would be required to negotiate a settlement.

But the wins were obvious and none more so than for Kim.

The dictator achieved his wish to appear an equal on a global stage with the president of the world's mightiest military power. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.