Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

Talking Heads Star Gives Audience's Brains a Polish

Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

Talking Heads Star Gives Audience's Brains a Polish

Article excerpt

FIRST NIGHT David Byrne Eventim Apollo, W6 David Smyth ON a bare stage, David Byrne sat at a table, holding a brain. A silver beaded curtain hung across three sides of an empty space traditionally filled with amplifiers, microphone stands, instruments the rowdy clutter of a concert. Byrne, who at 66 could easily be coasting on a rich back catalogue of solo and Talking Heads material, instead deconstructed and reimagined the live music experience in a way that was daringly ambitious and full of joy. It felt as though he had removed our brains, polished them and put them back with a new appreciation for what a show could be.

He was joined by 11 other musicians in matching grey suits. Fastdancing backing singers Chris Giarmo and Tendayi Kuumba wore headset microphones, as did Byrne, and everyone else had their instruments strapped to them. Choreographed by Annie-B Parson of New York's Big Dance Theater, they moved in marching lines and circles, casting looming shadows on the curtain during the rollicking funk of Blind. …

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