Newspaper article Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England)

Keeping Beaches Clean Shore Takes Lot of Work; When Sun Shines, the Amount of Rubbish Left Rises

Newspaper article Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England)

Keeping Beaches Clean Shore Takes Lot of Work; When Sun Shines, the Amount of Rubbish Left Rises

Article excerpt

Byline: SONIA SHARMA Reporter sonia.sharma@trinitymirror.com @TheSharminator

WITH the summer season kicking off, thousands of people are hitting the beach to enjoy our stunning coastline.

But with this comes an increase in littering, with vast amounts of rubbish being left along our beaches, especially when the weather is good. So how do the authorities help to keep the seaside spick and span? We met North Tyneside Council's beach cleaning team to find out what happens behind the scenes.

Marcus Jackson, environmental services team leader, explained that a beach-cleaning machine with a Surf Rake is used to clear away rubbish from Tynemouth Longsands and Cullercoats beaches every morning from Monday to Friday.

When the weather is good and a large number of visitors are expected, it is also brought out at weekends. Operators can be out as early as 4am to clean the sand before people start to arrive.

All the rubbish raked in is dropped into a skip and taken to the tip.

In addition, staff manually clear away waste with litter pickers seven days a week. Their job also involves continuously emptying bins on the beach during the day, keeping promenades, access stairs and ramps clean, and strimming grass edges where needed.

However, natural or marine materials, which are not contaminated, such as seaweed, are put back into the sea at designated locations or used on the front of sand dunes, helping to trap the wind or act as fertilisers.

Meanwhile, Whitley Bay beach and King Edward's Bay are being cleaned manually. Access for the tractor is difficult at King Edward's Bay and the beach condition at Whitley Bay, which currently has more stones and rocks, can damage the machine. However, the vehicle can be used there, without the rake, to remove large items such as nets, fallen trees or timber. …

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