Newspaper article Evening Gazette (Middlesbrough, England)

Family Hails Coroner's Call for Action; 'HEALTH TRUST FAILED OUR MUM'

Newspaper article Evening Gazette (Middlesbrough, England)

Family Hails Coroner's Call for Action; 'HEALTH TRUST FAILED OUR MUM'

Article excerpt

Byline: DAVE ROBSON dave.robson@reachplc.com @Daverobson_gaz

A FAMILY grieving a great-greatgran's death has welcomed a coroner's call for a Teesside health trust to take action.

Eston pensioner Olive Mitchell, 76, who suffered with lung condition COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease) died at James Cook University Hospital, in Middlesbrough, on November 11, 2017. This was seven days after being admitted following a fall at home.

Her inquest recorded she died from "natural causes aggravated by neglect", sparking Teesside Senior Coroner Clare Bailey to write to South Tees Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust calling for changes in procedure to be made.

And in a stark message to the trust, she stated: "In my opinion, there is a risk that future deaths will occur unless action is taken."

The coroner's stance has been welcomed by Mrs Mitchell's family, with daughter Jeanette Cadman saying: "We want the trust to admit they failed my mother and to ensure something like this will never happen again to another family." Mrs Mitchell was taken to the hospital on November 4 after falling ill in her Bankfields bungalow.

But her family says they weren't happy from the start with the care she received, claiming she was incorrectly diagnosed with pneumonia and sepsis.

She was also given oxygen saturation up to a dangerously high level for her lung condition.

And then following an X-ray, wasn't properly reconnected to an oxygen supply, leaving her without it for at least two hours.

At Mrs Mitchell's inquest, the medical causes of death were given as: | Exacerbation of COPD | Cor pulmonale, generalised atherosclerosis - a complication of COPD.

But after considering the circumstances surrounding Mrs Mitchell's seven-day stay in hospital, the coroner flagged up two main "matters of concern" - medical training and communication between medical professionals. She said there was a "lack of appreciation as to the medical consequences of providing too much oxygen to a lady with Olive's medical condition. …

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