Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

Museum Celebrates the Sound of Cenotaph Silence; Recordings Show Decades of Remembrance since First World War

Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

Museum Celebrates the Sound of Cenotaph Silence; Recordings Show Decades of Remembrance since First World War

Article excerpt

Byline: Robert Dex Arts Correspondent

THE sound of silence is coming to the Imperial War Museum as part of an immersive installation examining how the nation remembers conflict.

Visitors will be able to hear the first ever recorded silence, captured at the Cenotaph in 1929, as well as memorial ceremonies that took place in locations as far apart as a base camp at Mount Everest, a nuclear submarine and a biscuit factory in Harlesden.

The show, created by designers from 59 Productions who worked on the sellout David Bowie exhibition at the V&A, was inspired by the idea of a national Hall of Remembrance, proposed after the First World War but never built.

Susie Thornberry, the museum's assistant director, said: "We were really intrigued by this idea that we came across that the Ministry of Information had planned a Hall of Remembrance.

"We've got some of the minutes of meetings and early sketches but that is all. The idea was never realised and instead the concept of remembrance was dispersed around the country and there are minutes of silence and war memorials."

Among the silences are recordings made in a Tooting primary school last year, at the African and Caribbean War Memorial at Brixton, by the side of the temporary ice rink in Somerset House, and at Liverpool Street Station and St Paul's Cathedral. …

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