Newspaper article The Florida Times Union

High Risks in Political Filmmaking

Newspaper article The Florida Times Union

High Risks in Political Filmmaking

Article excerpt

For American actors, politics isn't a contact sport. True, most of them like to hobnob with successful politicians, a smaller number become involved in issue advocacy, and an even smaller percentage run for office.

But as far as their work goes, actors really don't have to worry about consequences even when they make ostensibly political movies.

This is all to the good. If an actor finds a political role risk-free, then he's likely to take on a variety of them, expanding the possibility that all sorts of ideas will make their way to the screen.

Not every country offers this opportunity. A case in point comes courtesy of Cabaret Balkan, the anti-Slobodan Milosevic Yugoslav film.

The problem isn't per se that the cast made an anti-government statement. Given that at least three of the stars are among the biggest in Yugoslavia and that the Milosevic government doesn't want to be seen making grossly repressive moves (preferring indirect methods), the cast is at least relatively safe. …

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