Newspaper article Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England)

Chess WITH THE KNIGHT in Association with Newcastle

Newspaper article Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England)

Chess WITH THE KNIGHT in Association with Newcastle

Article excerpt

WHAT'S the difference between old, experienced and mature? And what has it got to do with chess? Well I think it is significant.

Stating the obvious, old is to do with ageing, something we have no control over. Maturing and gaining experience we do have some control over, if we choose to use it.

On Friday night at Forest Hall Chess Club there were people playing chess as young as five and as old as 86. They were all playing alongside each other with the same enthusiasm, same commitment, same will to win and same desire to enjoy the evening. The majority were home team players but they were joined by players from Morpeth and Tynemouth chess clubs for matches. The thinking skills of each were evident. The youngest were working things out as they went along, hopefully remembering basic lessons they had been taught: develop pieces, don't make too many pawn moves early on, get your king safe, watch out for unguarded pieces, try to control the centre of the board etc.

The older players sometimes played routinely through the opening, making moves they had made many times before. But it's not many moves into a game that a new and unfamiliar position occurs, even for experienced players. It's here that the need for creativity kicks in, to assess the position, to choose to attack or consolidate or defend. Making the right decisions at this point frequently determines the outcome. A strong series of moves often leads to victory, a weak series to defeat. But even in a poor position it is worth battling on; it only takes one weak move by your opponent to give you a chance to rescue yourself. Win, draw or lose, at the end of the game you shake hands and often have a chat with your opponent. Confidence lifted or pride dented, nobody is hurt! It's just a game. But it is a game with special features. It teaches self-reliance. It requires creativity and imagination. To play well, you need powers of concentration and persistence, and the ability to evaluate situations and choose the best way forward...and not to give up, if the going gets tough. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.