Newspaper article Fraser Coast Chronicle (Hervey Bay, Australia)

Dreaming of a Red; the Festive Season Usually Means We Treat Ourselves to Something Extra Special

Newspaper article Fraser Coast Chronicle (Hervey Bay, Australia)

Dreaming of a Red; the Festive Season Usually Means We Treat Ourselves to Something Extra Special

Article excerpt

Byline: Ivan Montaut

THE solstice was celebrated in Greek culture and was later taken to a greater level in Roman times, especially after the first Julian calendar (named after the emperor Julius Caesar) was set out in 45BC. Originally for the Romans, this was a week-long festival celebrating the renewal of light as the sun started its journey back to the northern hemisphere.

These festivities included the exchange of gifts, lavish house decorations and a lot of feasting, drinking and merrymaking.

Western society has derived many traditions from the Roman festival of Saturnalia (the predecessor of the Christmas season) but it wasn't until the (Pope) Gregorian calendar was internationally accepted in 1582 when solstice, previously celebrated on December 25, was corrected to the December 21 but the old traditions still lived on.

Now in modern times with the merrymaking, eating and drinking associated with the season the only question is, are you dreaming of a white Christmas ... or a red one.

This of course depends on the food element as in Australia we have a huge choice of seafood, white meats and festive treats with a wide selection of liquid accompaniment from which to choose to match our favourite dishes. Sparkling is the wine of celebration but at meals it is usually used as an aperitif and there are many differing whites and reds which can suit the occasion. These celebrations usually mean we treat ourselves to something extra special in terms of food and wine so at this time loosen the purse a little and explore the higher quality wines to match your superior food choices.

Seafood benefits from a lighter style wine so it's a choice of sauvignon blanc, pinot gris/grigio, viognier or a light chardonnay in the unwooded or a cool climate style.

Wooded chardonnay or viognier will handle white meats better than the light whites and of course in the red selection pinot noir or grenache will suit the meat. A GSM, a grenache/shiraz/mouvedre blend, serves as a deeper alternative to the lighter pinot. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.