Newspaper article Evening Gazette (Middlesbrough, England)

Fleecy Does It; with First Frosts Now upon Us, It's Not Just Christmas Presents That Need Wrapping Up. It's Time to Treat Your Tender Plants to a New Winter Jacket

Newspaper article Evening Gazette (Middlesbrough, England)

Fleecy Does It; with First Frosts Now upon Us, It's Not Just Christmas Presents That Need Wrapping Up. It's Time to Treat Your Tender Plants to a New Winter Jacket

Article excerpt

Byline: YOUR GARDEN With David Domoney

JUMPING Jack Frost, it's starting to get cold outside - and your plants may need a little extra protection to help them survive the winter.

Many hardy types will handle the British weather but by spending a little time giving them some help, you can enjoy total peace of mind.

CONTAINER-GROWN PLANTS in pots are vulnerable to frost because the large exposed surface area makes their soil more prone to freezing than that in the ground.

As water freezes, it expands, which can damage delicate roots, especially if the pot cracks and exposes them directly to the cold. This puts all pot plants at risk of damage, no matter what variety.

Unglazed terracotta pots are especially prone to cracking, but the steps to protect your plants will protect their pots as well.

Fortunately, container plants are easy to deal with. Your best defence is to move them to a sheltered spot beneath the eaves of the house or against a fence or wall.

Heat from the house, and the reduced air flow, will protect them from the most severe cold.

Wrapping pots with bubble wrap from Christmas deliveries is also good, providing an insulating layer to shield roots from the frost.

Be sure to leave soil and drainage holes exposed to allow watering.

Standing containers on pot feet or wine corks will also help drainage, leaving pots less likely to crack since there is less water in the pot to freeze - but take care not to block drainage holes.

shallow -rooted plants VARIETIES with shallow root systems, like Heuchera and strawberries, are prone to frost heave - where repeated freezing and thawing of groundwater pushes their roots out of the ground.

Moisture-retentive soils, such as heavy clay, can be worse as there is more water in them to cause issues.

An easy way to avoid frost heave is with a thick layer of mulch, providing a barrier to insulate roots and protect plants from temperature fluctuations. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.