Newspaper article Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England)

Time for Reflection; as 2018 Draws to a Close, Why Not Get Plans in Order for the New Gardening Year Ahead?

Newspaper article Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England)

Time for Reflection; as 2018 Draws to a Close, Why Not Get Plans in Order for the New Gardening Year Ahead?

Article excerpt

Byline: YOUR GARDEN With Diarmuid Gavin

IT'S that time of the year when we look back and look forward, remembering the past and anticipating the future. Gardening is epitomised by faith and hope, and gardeners are optimistic by nature.

We tend to learn through reviewing our successes and failures, and these lessons inform our next gardening steps.

Like so many others, I've embraced the houseplant revolution by not only filling my home with plants such as palms, ferns and rubber plants, but I've also been busy planting up terrariums and bottle gardens.

This renewed interest led me to open a city centre plant shop, and among the top sellers is Monstera (known as the Swiss cheese plant), which likes bright surroundings but it should be kept away from direct sunlight. If kept warm and occasionally misted, it will grow quite large. Calatheas have also been very popular and it's easy to see why. Their pleasing oval leaves have deep green veins with a dusting of blush pink, and they let you know if they're thirsty by adopting a rather drooping stance!

Sansevierias are known as the mother-in-law's tongue and with tall, strap-like foliage, they make a striking statement in any interior design. A must-have when it comes to indoor greenery, they are easy to care for, requiring just a little water every few weeks.

I made the decision at the start of the year to really put the work in at home and finish some gardening jobs which I'd been avoiding.

For once it was a New Year's resolution I stuck to and I'm now the proud owner of a new grove of wonderful bamboo, which in time, will create a lovely screen between me and the neighbours. I lifted bits of the lawn and gave the space to perennials and grasses.

The conical-shaped bay trees, which I'd used as mechanically twirling specimens at the 2016 Chelsea Flower Show, were repatriated and planted throughout my plot, creating spiky columns of dark green, which even in mid-winter make a statement. …

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