Newspaper article The Queensland Times (Ipswich, Australia)

Sanitation, Water on the Agenda; Increasing Population Brings Problems of Its Own

Newspaper article The Queensland Times (Ipswich, Australia)

Sanitation, Water on the Agenda; Increasing Population Brings Problems of Its Own

Article excerpt

TIME PAST

BERYL JOHNSTON

AN ARTICLE in the North Australian newspaper of April 22, 1858, stated: "The immediate wants of Ipswich are good water and proper sewerage arrangements.

"The health, comfort, happiness and prosperity of its inhabitants depends on the early solution of these two subjects.

"Ipswich must have been a very smelly town, as the Bremer River is our source of supply and it is loaded with putrefying animal matter from the boiling down establishment on its banks.

"Ipswich is situated in a hollow between two hills and is exposed to the direct and reflected heat of the sun, rendering it one of the hottest localities probably in the district.

"The intention of those concerned about these problems envisage the laying down of water and sewerage mains between Mortimer and Waghorn streets and from the river to Roderick St.

"It was also, though, by forming a dam across the river to provide steam power for lifting the water 60.96m high forming a service reservoir to hold 151,416 gallons to a point below the town from whence diluted with water from the river, it may be employed in manuring and irrigating thousands of acres below the town."

The idea of recycling water (not for drinking purposes) was on the agenda in 1858.

CRICKET GROUND

Mention was made of the Whitwood Cricket Ground at Ebbw Vale in the early days of Ipswich.

The club was connected with the Whitwood Collieries, which were owned by brothers William, Joseph and John Stafford, and many cricket matches were played there by the principal Ipswich teams known as the Southern Stars, the Limestones, the Federals and the Alberts.

One incident remembered at the time was the fact that Bill Lindsay Snr, who was a fast bowler, knocked smoke out of a star batsman "Bob" McGill, while batting opposite to Lindsay, who delivered a regular "wind jammer" which struck McGill on his trouser pocket, in which was a box of wax matches.

In less than a jiffy, McGill was enveloped in a cloud of smoke through the contents becoming ignited. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.