Newspaper article The Queensland Times (Ipswich, Australia)

Concerns Put into the Light; Ipswich Residents Urged to Be Smarter in the Sun

Newspaper article The Queensland Times (Ipswich, Australia)

Concerns Put into the Light; Ipswich Residents Urged to Be Smarter in the Sun

Article excerpt

Byline: Lachlan McIvor Lachlan.McIvor@qt.com.au

Sun safety facts:

Skin cancer affects people with all skin types

Skin cancer can affect you at any age

You need to use sun protection every day, whether it is sunny, cloudy or raining

Fake tanning lotions and spray tans do not protect your skin from UVR because they do not contain sun protection factor (SPR)

Spot the warning signs:

Melanoma

A -- asymmetry (moles or spots that are irregular in shape)

B -- border (changes in the border of a mole or spot)

C -- colour (blotchy or multi-coloured spots including black and red)

D -- diameter (expanding size)

E -- evolving (changes in the nature of the lesion)

Squamous cell carcinoma (non-melanoma skin cancer)

Characterised by thick, red scaly spots that look crusty and bleed easily. Most common in adults over 50 years.

Basal cell carcinoma (non-melanoma skin cancer)

Characterised by red, pale or pearly raised lumps that do not heal.

CALLS for Australians to make applying sunscreen as common as brushing their teeth every morning has been welcomed by local medical professionals, with skin cancer labelled as a "real cause of concern" in Ipswich.

Revised national sun safety guidelines recommend sunscreen is used every morning after the dangers of repeated small doses of UV rays were examined by the country's peak health bodies.

Australians are advised to apply sunscreen when the maximum UV level was forecast to be three or higher, not just when they planned to spend a considerable time outside.

The UV Index is predicted to reach an extreme level of 14 in Ipswich today according to the Bureau of Meteorology.

West Moreton Health oncologist Dr Ross Cruikshank said he hoped an increased awareness of the sun safety message would lead to a reduction in the prevalence of skin cancers in Ipswich and around Queensland. …

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