Art Merits Its Own Form of Tamper-Resistant Packaging

Article excerpt

I upgraded my computer last week so that it would conform

to my current needs.

I didn't understand the process very well, but I know it

had something to do with memory and parity.

The whole thing made me think of some art issues that have been

surfacing lately, issues that also have something to do with

memory and parity.

First is the situation with a statue that commemorates

suffragists Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton and

Lucretia Mott.

The sculpture by Adelaide Johnson had been sitting in the

basement of the Capitol since 1921, but has recently been moved

to greater visibility in the Rotunda for the next year.

Some African-American women's groups feel that the statue

leaves out the contributions of black suffragist Sojourner

Truth.

They want parity. They want Truth included in our national

memory.

"We are sick and tired of being left out of the history of this

nation," said C. Delores Tucker, chairwoman of the National

Political Congress of Black Women, in a recent Knight-Ridder

story.

One of the suggestions to make amends is to sculpt an image of

Truth on one end of the statue where the marble is not carved.

But Karen Staser, co-chairwoman of the Woman Suffrage Statue

Campaign that worked to get the statue moved upstairs, says we

shouldn't change a completed work of art.

She's in favor of a new statue that would recognize Truth and

other black suffragists whose contributions have been ignored.

The second controversy swirls around the memorial to former

president Franklin D. Roosevelt that just opened a few weeks ago

along the Potomac River.

This fight is over whether or not Roosevelt should have been

sculpted sitting in a wheelchair.

Some disabled groups, and more than half the living Roosevelt

grandchildren, want to see that, according to a Knight-Ridder

story.

President Clinton has said he'll ask Congress to add a

depiction of Roosevelt with his disability even though Roosevelt

fought to conceal his disability from the public.

One suggestion is a bas-relief carving somewhere on the

existing monument. …