Newspaper article The Florida Times Union

Waiting for a Little Bizkit Settling in for a Long Wait, the Fans of Limp Bizkit Awaited, Some Patiently, Some Not, to See Their Rock Idols in Concert

Newspaper article The Florida Times Union

Waiting for a Little Bizkit Settling in for a Long Wait, the Fans of Limp Bizkit Awaited, Some Patiently, Some Not, to See Their Rock Idols in Concert

Article excerpt

Hundreds of rain-soaked fans roared at 2 p.m. yesterday when officials led them from the rain-soaked parking lot at the Town & Country Shopping Center to a covered area against the strip mall. There, the crowd would wait until this morning to receive wristbands granting them admittance to tonight's free Limp Bizkit concert at Edge 2000.

The line snaked past several storefronts and held mostly teenagers, many of whom brought amenities such as radios, playing cards and cell phones to pass the time. One fan, 16-year-old David Truax, formed a makeshift bed from lawn chairs and a sleeping bag. A cooler holding soft drinks had a message written in magic marker: Limp Bizkit or Bust.

"It's pretty cool to be here," he said. "I'd rather be doing this, going to the show, than being at home."

Home is where his mother, France Truax, will sleep as her son waits through the night for his wristband.

"I don't like it 'cause he's my baby," she said while dropping him off. "But it's worth the experience."

Though most of the line was comprised of fans in their teens and 20s, many parents planned to spend the night with their children.

First in line was John Jinkner, 39, who waited with his two daughters, 15-year-old Ashley and 16-year-old Brandi. Both girls were overwhelmed with the prospect of seeing Limp Bizkit for free.

"I think it's so cool," Ashley said. "The first time I heard it on the radio I was like 'Oh my God, I have to come!' "

"It's worth it, definitely," Brandi added. "No blankets, no chairs, we're gonna sit on concrete, sleep on concrete, eat on concrete. That's our life."

Jinkner admitted that he likes the band's music, too. But it was clear that he waited in line mostly to share the experience with his daughters.

"I don't think I would come by myself," he said. "It's all for the kids."

In their first hour in line, Jinkner's daughters made friends with Sarah Tate, 14, who also waited with her father. Predictably, Sarah shared the Jinkners' excitement.

"[I'll] probably just do nothing but sit here and be very excited and scream as loud as I can," she said. "I'm never going to be bored."

Further back in the line, some fans were disgruntled. Joe Hipsher, 16, expressed his discontent about being confined to a crowded area surrounded with yellow police tape.

"They got us taped off. . . . They should tell us how many people are ahead of us. That way we know if we can go or if we actually have a chance at getting a wristband," he said. "We can't go to McDonald's, and it's so tempting over there."

Hipsher added that, in an effort to pass the time, he would "sit here and ridicule people."

Also nonplussed was Bill Koonce, owner of the Wholesale Shoe Warehouse. Koonce gazed helplessly through his store windows as the fans lined up outside his store. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.