Newspaper article The Florida Times Union

Finding Some Physical, Mental Space to Work at Home

Newspaper article The Florida Times Union

Finding Some Physical, Mental Space to Work at Home

Article excerpt

NEW YORK -- For many entrepreneurs, home and office are one and the same. They start companies out of their houses or apartments to save money, or because they want a different lifestyle.

But many at-home business owners soon encounter what can only be called boundary issues -- they have trouble creating physical and mental space to help their companies thrive and help themselves find some work-family balance.

"You really need to find a place in your home that can be separate," said Sarah Edwards, an author who has written several books with her husband, Paul, about working from home.

"A lot of people think they can put their home office anywhere," Edwards said. "They do it on the dining room table, or say 'I'll do it in the little desk alcove in the kitchen.' "

That may work for some people, but others find that the lack of boundaries between living and work space makes it harder to get a job done. There are plenty of distractions: children, the family phone, the refrigerator, the TV, just a couple of household chores that need to be done. …

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