Newspaper article The Florida Times Union

Targeted Officers Testify in Sheriff's Office Probe Grand Jury Investigation Could End Next Month

Newspaper article The Florida Times Union

Targeted Officers Testify in Sheriff's Office Probe Grand Jury Investigation Could End Next Month

Article excerpt

A federal grand jury investigating allegations of corruption in the Jacksonville Sheriff's Office heard yesterday from two of five police officers stripped of their powers as targets in the probe.

The appearances by Jason Pough and Reginald Bones added to a flurry of activity this week involving the grand jury and the yearlong investigation, which started with allegations of police tipping drug dealers and has expanded into possible police involvement in murder, robbery and other crimes. Bones, who quit the force three weeks ago, has testified once before.

Other action included:

-- Grand jurors heard Monday from the half brother of a man whose unsolved murder has been linked to the probe. Yesterday, they also heard from a police sergeant who wrote a robbery report in which the victim said the robbers were driving a police car.

-- A potential witness was revealed yesterday as Deputy Managing Assistant U.S. Attorney Jim Klindt, speaking at the sentencing of Douglas Dixon in an unrelated drug case, told a judge that Dixon has been cooperating in the grand jury investigation. Klindt said Dixon's help could get him a further reduction in the 46-month sentence he got for conspiracy to distribute cocaine.

-- Two attorneys from the criminal division of the U.S. Department of Justice in Washington flew to Jacksonville to join Klindt Monday in the case. It is unusual for federal authorities to get involved in investigations such as local homicides, unless they are suspicious of civil rights violations or federal racketeering violations. The attorneys and Klindt declined to discuss their role.

The grand jury has been meeting several times a month, and those familiar with its work said it could wrap up as early as next month.

Since the grand jury proceedings are secret, it's unknown what was said during the nearly three hours Pough spent behind closed doors or the hour Bones was there. …

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