Newspaper article The Florida Times Union

'Domainia' Starts Anew over Web Address Additions Nobody Knows Cost or Availability Date

Newspaper article The Florida Times Union

'Domainia' Starts Anew over Web Address Additions Nobody Knows Cost or Availability Date

Article excerpt

The newly authorized batch of Web addresses ending in .info, .biz and five other suffixes won't be available until spring at the earliest. But news that they will be put up for rent is already igniting the same sort of name-grabbing madness that a year ago drove the price of some .com addresses into the millions of dollars.

Less than 24 hours after the Internet Corp. for Assigned Names and Numbers voted to add the first major set of names in more than a decade, everyone from business executives to schoolchildren rushed to a computer to try to pre-register a popular name he might be able to capitalize on. At the same time, panicked corporate officials placed calls to their attorneys to strategize about how to protect their trademarks from so-called cybersquatters in an ever-expanding online world that will include .pro, .name, .coop, .museum and .aero.

"I can't believe Microsoft is even going to let microsoft.museum go," suggested Business.com editor in chief Peter Gumbel, who says he's been involved in his own series of discussions over domain names. Business.com made headlines last year when it purchased its moniker for a record $7.5 million.

Joseph Kibur, chief executive of domain-name registrar NetNation Communications Inc., which is part of a consortium of 19 companies awarded the rights to names ending in .info, said much of Friday's activity was due to confusion about how names would be doled out.

"Our phones literally have been ringing off the hook," he said. "No one really seems to know what's going on."

That's because detailed plans have not yet been made. "We're just catching our breath from this week and we haven't mapped out where we're going next," said Andrew McLaughlin, chief policy officer for ICANN.

One issue to resolve is price. People can now register names for about $35 a year, but some think the new domain names could be significantly more expensive, especially if the registration companies must assess the suitability of some applicants. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.