Newspaper article The Florida Times Union

Dyeing to Get into the Jekyll Island Easter Egg Hunt Students Shell out Time, Energy 2,000 Expected to Seek Goodies

Newspaper article The Florida Times Union

Dyeing to Get into the Jekyll Island Easter Egg Hunt Students Shell out Time, Energy 2,000 Expected to Seek Goodies

Article excerpt

Byline: Teresa Stepzinski, Times-Union staff writer

JEKYLL ISLAND -- Ashley Faulk was up to her wrists in red dye and having an eggs-cellent time yesterday.

"My mom taught me not to leave them pale. You've got to keep the eggs in there about five to 10 minutes to get them really pretty," said Ashley, as she rolled over a submerged egg to coat it evenly with food coloring.

Ashley, 11, was among two dozen fifth-grade Student Council members from Burroughs-Molette Elementary School in Brunswick who dipped, dyed and air-dried eggs for tomorrow's 24th annual Great Golden Easter Egg Hunt on Jekyll Island.

The event is the largest of its kind in Southeast Georgia, said Cindy Thomas, spokeswoman for the Jekyll Island Authority, which manages the state-owned island.

"We'll have a total of 20,000 Easter eggs. Half are real hard-boiled dyed eggs, and the other 10,000 are plastic ones filled with goodies. We're expecting up to 2,000 people for the Easter egg hunt," Thomas said.

Thomas said the dyed eggs will be given out in baskets to families attending the festivities so they can take them home and hide them for Easter. The plastic ones will be used in the island Easter Egg Hunt tomorrow afternoon, she said.

The children agreed that hiding plastic eggs instead of real ones would be best for the hunt.

"We left one up in a tree about a year and a half because we hid it for my cousin to find but he didn't and then we forgot it was there. It was pretty bad by the time we did find it," said Jennifer Cormican, 11, as she dunked a pair of eggs into a pan of red dye.

Beth Carroll, student council adviser, said youngsters from Burroughs-Molette have been the volunteer egg-dyers for the hunt since 1997. The island authority is the school's Partner in Education, she said.

"The kids have really got it down pat. One dips the egg in the dye, another wipes off the excess and another stacks it in the carton to dry," Carroll said.

The eggs were donated by the Georgia Egg Commission, Thomas said. …

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