Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

'Water Is the Way to Cool Down the Tube'; Scientists Tap into Fresh Way to Lower Temperatures on Underground

Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

'Water Is the Way to Cool Down the Tube'; Scientists Tap into Fresh Way to Lower Temperatures on Underground

Article excerpt

Byline: PATRICK MCGOWAN

THE solution to the sweltering nightmare of the Tube is as elegant as it is simple, claim two London scientists.

They looked at two major problems facing the Underground and say they have found an environmentally-friendly way of reducing summer rush-hour temperatures in carriages by more than 20F.

This week the Evening Standard recorded temperatures of up to 100F in packed Tube carriages, causing some passengers to faint.

Dr Graeme Maidment and Dr John Missenden from South Bank University believe that figure could be reduced to a much more acceptable 76F. It would feel even cooler because the humidity would also be reduced.

The plan involves water, but not the bottled variety which was handed out on Monday to unimpressed passengers at Oxford Circus and Piccadilly Circus stations.

Every day London Underground pumps out millions of gallons of water which would otherwise flood the deepest parts of the system as the capital's water table steadily rises.

This water is available winter and summer at an almost constant 51F. By passing it through large heat exchangers, effectively radiators working in reverse, and using fans, billions of cubic feet of cooled air could be pumped into the Tube. The trains would push the air around the network.

In recent days LU has dismissed the idea of introducing air conditioning on Tubes because of the near impossibility, 100 feet underground, of getting rid of the excess heat produced by the conditioning units.

While the Maidment/Missenden solution gets round this problem it would require increased ventilation of the carriages to circulate the cooled air around the tunnels.

Dr Maidment said: "The key to this is that we are using a resource, lots of cool water, that is already there and, as a side benefit, less water will have to be pumped out. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.