Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

Manhattan and Paris Match; Designer William Yeoward's Brief to His Interior Decorator Was to Turn His Battersea Flat into a Cross between Upper West Side New York and Retro Paris. an Unpredictable Blend of Elements Was Used to Achieve This, Says Leonie Highton Homes & Property

Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

Manhattan and Paris Match; Designer William Yeoward's Brief to His Interior Decorator Was to Turn His Battersea Flat into a Cross between Upper West Side New York and Retro Paris. an Unpredictable Blend of Elements Was Used to Achieve This, Says Leonie Highton Homes & Property

Article excerpt

Byline: LEONIE HIGHTON

AS I started my tour of William Yeoward's new flat overlooking Battersea Park, he said: "I shall keep out of your way and let Colin do the talking. Colin did the design, so he can explain it better." And off he went to another room. But Yeoward, being Yeoward, was back and joining in two minutes later.

Everything about the flat - from its logical new layout and light and subtle colours to its concealed storage spaces, arrangement of furniture and interesting art - hangs together.

Being in a mansion block, the flat enjoys traditional proportions but it had been opened up in a way that neither liked.

Yeoward, an interior designer, manufacturer of home goods and shop owner, and interior designer Colin Orchard decided on a major rearrangement, which involved repositioning doorways, adding and subtracting walls and giving the main bedroom area, which includes a bathroom, dressing room and small study, a sense of separation.

What Yeoward wanted was a home that, in its layout, decoration and feel, could be loosely described as a cross between Upper West Side New York and retro Paris. The newly enlarged space at the core of the flat is now a dining room, which is also an inner hall, with the drawing room, kitchen and sleeping quarters leading from it. It has a window in one corner, but thanks to the introduction of a wide doorway in the drawing room, opposite the bay window, it benefits from additional natural light when the double doors are open.

In all, five doorways lead off the dining room. Realising that a conventional decoration treatment would emphasise the "broken" perimeter of the room, Orchard panelled the walls and continued the effect across the doors so that when closed, they "disappear" within the scheme. The restructuring of the room and the panelled overlay demonstrate the designer's ability to think threedimensionally.

Orchard appreciates the relaxed comfort of the country-house look, having developed his style at Colefax and Fowler, but his taste has become increasingly varied and he has acquired a greater leaning towards 20th century retro. …

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