Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

What Women Want; (A Body like Catherine Zeta-Jones, of Course, but to Look Good for Themselves - Not for Men )

Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

What Women Want; (A Body like Catherine Zeta-Jones, of Course, but to Look Good for Themselves - Not for Men )

Article excerpt

Byline: HUGH DOUGHERTY

THEY want to look like Catherine Zeta-Jones, wear clothes to please themselves and earn higher salaries than ever before. Meet the Wincies: the 16- to 34-year-olds who make up the Women in Control generation.

The 2002 answer to the Yuppies, they are better-educated, better paid and busier than ever before but they still have enough time to spend almost an hour getting ready for a romantic night out.

The social phenomenon was discovered in a major study of 1,000 men and women of all ages, carried out by independent researchers the Future Foundation for Marks and Spencer.

William Nelson, senior analyst with the Future Foundation, said: "Our research found there is a generation of women who are in control of their careers, their relationships and increasingly their finances. It is at every level.

"We found young women expect to be in control of every aspect of their lives. These are women who have grown up in the aftermath of the feminist revolution and who do not feel they have to fight to take control of their lives.

Women are performing better than men in education and increasingly have better career prospects."

Most women said they wanted to look like Catherine Zeta-Jones, with Jennifer Lopez and Kylie in second and third place.

Mr Nelson said: "Catherine Zeta-Jones is the sort of celebrity whose appearance is more about pleasing herself than explicitly appealing to men.

"Women want to be in control of their appearance. We found that women in control of their lives were more concerned about body shape than body size, and Catherine Zeta Jones reflects that."

The study revealed that, if they could change one aspect of their bodies, most women would want slimmer thighs - with a slimmer waist and a "less lumpy and bumpy figure" in joint second place.

But it also found only nine per cent would consider plastic surgery.

Most had resorted to more conventional methods of altering their shape, with 39 per cent wearing controlling underwear, 30 per cent using tanning lotion and 21 per cent squeezing into jeans that were a size too small (see the"Methods considered/used to improve appearance" table). …

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