Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

Imagination's All You Need Corinne Julius

Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

Imagination's All You Need Corinne Julius

Article excerpt

Byline: CORINNE JULIUS

THIS year the Peugeot Awards have come of age.

Gone is the preoccupation with trendiness. Instead, the emphasis is on good-looking, functional and socially responsible design.

One example of that is William Welch's adaptable cutlery. The thick silicone handles of the cutlery are filled with a smart material that responds to human touch, moulding itself to the user's hand.

The material restores itself to the original shape after use and can be cleaned in a dishwasher.

Designs for cutlery have barely changed for 200 years and Welch was determined to make his design radical as well as practical. "I hope that, aesthetically, people might find it engaging and fun," he says.

Designed to make life easier for the disabled, it's attractive enough to look at home on any elegant dining table.

Welch came up with his adaptable cutlery while studying at the Royal College of Art. His knives and forks won the Lord Snowdon award for Design for Disability at last year's RCA show.

He entered them for the Peugeot Awards in the hope of persuading a company to manufacture the product. If he wins, he intends to use the award money to start the production line rolling himself.

The wobbly pub and restaurant table should be a thing of the past thanks to the bearing mechanism pioneered in the smart chair by RCA graduate Nicholas Oxley. …

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