Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

Jackson 'Must Wear False Nose to Hide Damage from Surgery'; New Report Also Says Star Had Curse Put on Spielberg

Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

Jackson 'Must Wear False Nose to Hide Damage from Surgery'; New Report Also Says Star Had Curse Put on Spielberg

Article excerpt

Byline: JAMES LANGTON;RICHARD SIMPSON

MICHAEL Jackson's nose has been so badly damaged by plastic surgery that he has to wear a false tip, it has been claimed. Vanity Fair magazine reports in its latest issue that the singer wears a prosthetic end to his nose and quotes a source close to Jackson who says that the singer would otherwise resemble "a mummy with two nostril holes".

Last year Jackson shocked fans when he appeared in public in a court in California with skin peeling and what appeared to be a sticking plaster over his nostrils.

The magazine also reports that the 44-year-old star once paid u100,000 for a voodoo curse to kill film director Steven Spielberg.

The singer reportedly fell out with Spielberg after the director refused to give him the part of Peter Pan in his Hollywood blockbuster Hook.

He is said to have attended a voodoo ceremony in Switzerland where a witch doctor promised him that Spielberg and a list of 25 enemies, including record tycoon David Geffen, would suffer illfortune.

The report claims Jackson underwent a "blood bath" as part of the ceremony and later ordered his business adviser Myung-Ho Lee to wire the money to a witch doctor in Mali named Baba, who is said to have sacrificed 42 cows for the ceremony.

Vanity Fair also says that Jackson, who it claims wears a page boy wig and has artificially whitened his skin, is deeply in debt.

It claims that his declining record sales and extravagant lifestyle have left him about u175 million in the red.

His Neverland Ranch costs at least u2.5 million a year to run, with his private amusement park in its ground nearly repossessed in April 2001 for late payments.

He is also said to owe more than u500,000 on the payroll for his staff from a three-month period in 2000.

The magazine says he has borrowed millions to cover his expenses and will only be able to repay a u125 million loan due in the near future if he sells his most valuable asset, the Beatles' song catalogue. …

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